Archive for the ‘Baby Gifts’ Category

Out of the Mouth of …..

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Need help managing your business in tough economic times? This is a great post providing sound advice. At Occasionally Gifted and the OG Flower Market we are always looking for help in managing our business.

This post came to us from Spin Sucks and Lisa Gerber.

My stepfather and mother were visiting me this past weekend and I was looking forward to it. I happen to know my stepfather has been a bit concerned lately that I have taken, in his opinion, perhaps some unnecessary risks in my professional life. So I was happy to have the opportunity to defend my position, in person. You see, he’s a retired, successful businessman. He’s always been fiscally conservative, and given where he is in life, he is, justifiably, risk-averse. I have the utmost respect, and in the 20 years he has been in my life, I’ve always asked his advice on matters. But these past few years haven’t exactly been predictable. They haven’t followed the status quo. I felt a little disruption was in order and I share this with him, which is why we may not see eye to eye right now. I sat over a glass of wine explaining how it’s OK to live on the edge and not necessarily know what the outcome will be. I can’t worry too much about the risk I’m taking when the opportunity is great. And then, I had a sudden flashback to my three-year-old nephew’s visit earlier this year. We had asked him what he wanted to do that day: Would he rather go to the Museum of Science and Industry or to the Aquarium? He chose: “The bus!” And sitting there at that table, talking to my stepfather, I realized, in this particular situation, I think I’ll take advice from my nephew, thank you very much. He is not terribly concerned about where he’s going, but he does know he’d like to take a bus to get there. I’m not just talking about our personal lives, I’m talking about choices we make for our businesses, our employers, and our clients. We get so caught up in measuring outcomes, showing ROI, and minimizing risk but it has to be OK from time to time to throw it all up in the air, take a leap on something, and enjoy the feeling of freefall. (Hey, I said from time to time. I’m still a big fan of strategic planning and measurable outcomes.) I’m no spring chicken but given the past few years and the detours this economy has thrown in the road trips of our lives, (or train wrecks depending on who you’re talking to), doing something that is unexpected seemed in order. Minimize the risk, but don’t avoid it. Get the support of the people that matter most. Assess the worse case scenario and don’t focus on it, but be prepared for the worst. Take the leap! I don’t always want to worry about where I’m going to land. I know if I keep my head on my shoulders, I’ll land on my feet. Even if the desired outcome doesn’t, for any reason, materialize, it will open other doors along the way. Right? Enjoy the Ride originally appeared on Spin Sucks on November 2, 2011. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/spinsucks/feed/~3/JARSF7ZT9XE/ “>Flower Market we are always looking for sound advice.

My stepfather and mother were visiting me this past weekend and I was looking forward to it. I happen to know my stepfather has been a bit concerned lately that I have taken, in his opinion, perhaps some unnecessary risks in my professional life. So I was happy to have the opportunity to defend my position, in person. You see, he’s a retired, successful businessman. He’s always been fiscally conservative, and given where he is in life, he is, justifiably, risk-averse. I have the utmost respect, and in the 20 years he has been in my life, I’ve always asked his advice on matters. But these past few years haven’t exactly been predictable. They haven’t followed the status quo. I felt a little disruption was in order and I share this with him, which is why we may not see eye to eye right now. I sat over a glass of wine explaining how it’s OK to live on the edge and not necessarily know what the outcome will be. I can’t worry too much about the risk I’m taking when the opportunity is great. And then, I had a sudden flashback to my three-year-old nephew’s visit earlier this year. We had asked him what he wanted to do that day: Would he rather go to the Museum of Science and Industry or to the Aquarium? He chose: “The bus!” And sitting there at that table, talking to my stepfather, I realized, in this particular situation, I think I’ll take advice from my nephew, thank you very much. He is not terribly concerned about where he’s going, but he does know he’d like to take a bus to get there. I’m not just talking about our personal lives, I’m talking about choices we make for our businesses, our employers, and our clients. We get so caught up in measuring outcomes, showing ROI, and minimizing risk but it has to be OK from time to time to throw it all up in the air, take a leap on something, and enjoy the feeling of freefall. (Hey, I said from time to time. I’m still a big fan of strategic planning and measurable outcomes.) I’m no spring chicken but given the past few years and the detours this economy has thrown in the road trips of our lives, (or train wrecks depending on who you’re talking to), doing something that is unexpected seemed in order. Minimize the risk, but don’t avoid it. Get the support of the people that matter most. Assess the worse case scenario and don’t focus on it, but be prepared for the worst. Take the leap! I don’t always want to worry about where I’m going to land. I know if I keep my head on my shoulders, I’ll land on my feet. Even if the desired outcome doesn’t, for any reason, materialize, it will open other doors along the way. Right? Enjoy the Ride originally appeared on Spin Sucks on November 2, 2011. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/spinsucks/feed/~3/JARSF7ZT9XE/ “>OG Flower Market we are doing our best to follow good advice.

Originally Posted by Lisa Gerber on the Spin Sucks Blog

My stepfather and mother were visiting me this past weekend and I was looking forward to it. I happen to know my stepfather  has been a bit concerned lately that I have taken, in his opinion, perhaps some unnecessary risks in my professional life. So I was happy to have the opportunity to defend my position, in person.

You see, he’s a retired, successful businessman. He’s always been fiscally conservative, and given where he is in life, he is, justifiably, risk-averse. I have the utmost respect, and in the 20 years he has been in my life, I’ve always asked his advice on matters.

But these past few years haven’t exactly been predictable. They haven’t followed the status quo. I felt a little disruption was in order and I share this with him, which is why we may not see eye to eye right now.

I sat over a glass of wine explaining how it’s OK to live on the edge and not necessarily know what the outcome will be. I can’t worry too much about the risk I’m taking when the opportunity is great.

And then, I had a sudden flashback  to my three-year-old nephew’s visit earlier this year. We had asked him what he wanted to do that day: Would he rather go to the Museum of Science and Industry or to the Aquarium?

He chose: “The bus!”

And sitting there at that table, talking to my stepfather, I realized, in this particular situation, I think I’ll take advice from my nephew, thank you very much. He is not terribly concerned about where he’s going, but he does know he’d like to take a bus to get there.

I’m not just talking about our personal lives, I’m talking about choices we make for our businesses, our employers, and our clients. We get so caught up in measuring outcomes, showing ROI, and minimizing risk but it has to be OK from time to time to throw it all up in the air, take a leap on something, and enjoy the feeling of freefall. (Hey, I said from time to time. I’m still a big fan of strategic planning and measurable outcomes.)

I’m no spring chicken but given the past few years and the detours this economy has thrown in the road trips of our lives, (or train wrecks depending on who you’re talking to), doing something that is unexpected seemed in order.

Minimize the risk, but don’t avoid it.

Get the support of the people that matter most.
Assess the worse case scenario and don’t focus on it, but be prepared for the worst.
Take the leap!
I don’t always want to worry about where I’m going to land. I know if I keep my head on my shoulders, I’ll land on my feet. Even if the desired outcome doesn’t, for any reason, materialize, it will open other doors along the way.

Right?

Enjoy the Ride originally appeared on Spin Sucks on November 2, 2011.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/spinsucks/feed/~3/JARSF7ZT9XE/

The disappearing baby gift…

Friday, June 6th, 2008

I sent a baby gift basket week to a friend in the hospital.  I quickly learned the difficulty of sending a package to an organization that requires privacy for it’s ‘clients’.  Depending on the nurse, you might not even find out if the recipient is a patient if the nurse believes patient privacy is required in the instance you are phoning.  Another issue could be the receiving department.  Often times, FedEx or another major carrier has to give it to a receiving department who will then pass it on to the appropriate floor.  Sometimes, this dance is strained and toes get stepped on.  Have a peek at our page on baby gift basket etiquette.

Boogie Brown and the Baby Gift Notes

Sunday, May 18th, 2008
Music is said to ‘soothe the soul’.  Regardless of age, nothing compares to the melodic tones one can hear that instantly can transform a mood or attitude.  It’s important to remember the importance of these things.  It’s important to relate to the message it conveys.  That whether tired or sore, angry or sad, a good song or beat can drain away the pain.  Sometimes, the gift of music sends a message more powerful than any other object or possession.  When needing to send a baby gift, consider adding ‘music to the mix’.  A basket can contain sleepers and toys, and it can contain lullaby cd’s.  Music cd’s for babies are an excellent addition to any gift basket.  Custom designs are a great choice for including music that is personal and cherished.  An effective method for conveying the message of music, a baby gift can send a tremendous message to the recipient of caring and friendship.